Should You Choose a Lawyer to Write Your Will?

In an time where do-it-yourself methods are commonly encouraged for a variety of things, it’s a common misconception that you don’t need a lawyer when writing your will. It is important to save your family confusion and possible squabbles over your estate by having a Flagstaff lawyer draft your will.

Many people don’t understand the complexity that comes with writing a will and how to handle certain portions of their estate. In addition, there are state requirement that must be met to validate the will. Without those qualifiers, like having an independent witness sign the document, the will can be contested in court.

Why a Lawyer Should Write your Will

Not just any lawyer will do. You need to hire an attorney who is well versed in wills, trusts, and probate. Finding a reputable lawyer will ensure your assets are protected and will be hired as you plan. The benefits of hiring a lawyer to write your will include:

  • Save money: Without a legally binding will, your family may end up paying more in estate taxes and fees than you would for a lawyer to write the document in the first place.
  • Complicated process: Building a will can be complicated when it comes to dispersing your assets to your family. A lawyer can help explain the process and draft a document that leaves things just as you see fit. In addition, laws are constantly changing, so using a strong Flagstaff will lawyer will help alleviate the legal questions.
  • A will isn’t enough: By talking with an estate attorney, you may discover that writing a will isn’t enough. Creating an estate plan or drafting a trust may also be necessary parts of your planning process.
  • Peace of mind: Writing a will on your own and then worrying if it was done correctly causes undue stress. Save the energy and give yourself peace of mind by knowing the will is correct and formulated just as you desire.

Avoid the scenario where your family isn’t sure how your assets should be handled or who the executor is. Create a will, and possibly a trust or estate plan, to ensure what you leave behind is left in the right hands.